Anne with an E S1 : E1 – You Will Shall Decide Your Destiny

Aku menyesal karena baru mengenal tokoh bernama Anne Shirley sekarang. Keberadaan bukunya pun baru aku tahu beberapa tahun terakhir ini. Itu pun belum sempat aku baca. Anne benar-benar tokoh yang menarik dan penuh imajinasi, meski kadang kayaknya bisa capek berada di dekat dia. Meski aku belum tahu seperti apa karakter Anne yang diceritakan di buku, dan karenanya aku nggak bisa menilai apakah Amybeth McNulty yang memerankan Anne udah sesuai dengan deskripsi di bukunya, aku suka banget dengan aktingnya. Dia dituntut untuk bermain dengan segala emosi dan perubahannya bisa begitu cepat. Ada sih aktingnya yang nggak begitu meyakinkan, yaitu waktu dia marah sama Mrs. Lynde, tapi selebihnya aku menikmati aktingnya Amybeth. Cocok banget, baik dari perawakan maupun sikapnya. Akting tokoh-tokoh yang lain pun nggak kalah menarik. Hal lain yang aku suka tentunya dialognya. Makanya banyak banget yang masuk ke section My Fine Line. Settingnya pun nggak kalah menarik.

Ada satu bagian yang sedikit menganggu, yaitu sewaktu Jerry Baynard, yang digambarkan sebagai anak berdarah Prancis dengan logat Prancis yang masih sangat kental di sebagian besar dialog, tapi tiba-tiba ciri khasnya menghilang di dialog terakhir. Perubahan ini kentara banget buatku. Dan aku bertanya-tanya, apa sutradaranya nggak menyadari itu atau aku yang salah dengar?

 

 

MY FINE LINE

 

 

“I pray this isn’t foolishness, but it’s too late now. We made a practical decision. We’ll just have to hope for the best.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

“You can’t buy loyalty.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

“Bet it won’t take long for Rachel to come a-knocking. Lord knows she’s got a hunger for gossip like a person starved.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

Dialogue

Mrs. Spencer: Are you quite all right, dear?
Anne: I like imagining better than remembering. Why are the worst memories the most insistent?
Mrs. Spencer: I wouldn’t know. Try to rest.
Anne: “If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, but your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.” I love Jane Eyre, don’t you?
Mrs. Spencer: I never met her.
Anne: I’m glad you’ve woken. I have so many more questions for you about Green Gables.
Mrs. Spencer: I’m sure you do.

 

 

“But I’m bursting with curiosity.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Well, I’m sure the girl will be only too happy to tell you every little detail of what happened. She’s got a tongue of her own, that’s for certain.”

(Stationmaster)

 

 

“I suppose you are Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables? I’m very glad to see you. I was beginning to be afraid you weren’t coming, and I was imagining all the things that might’ve happened to prevent you. I’d made up my mind that if you didn’t come for me, I’d go down the track to that big wild cherry tree, and climb up into it and stay all night. I wouldn’t be a bit afraid, and it would be lovely to sleep on a tree all white with bloom in the moonshine, don’t you think? I can also imagine that I’m already a disappointment to you. I’m aware that I’m not much to look at, but even though I’m thin, I’m very strong. I want you to know that I’m forever grateful that you’re adopting me. You’re a sight for sore eyes, Mr. Cuthbert.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Ecstatic. I’ve never belonged to anybody before.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“I read once that a daughter is a little girl who grows up to be a friend.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“That cherry tree is my first friend here on the island.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“I never expect to be a bride myself. I’m so homely. Nobody would ever want to marry me. Unless he was a foreign missionary.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Am I talking too much? People are always telling me that I do, and it seems to cause aggravation. Would you rather I didn’t talk? If you say so, I’ll stop. I can stop when I make up my mind to it, although it’s difficult.
Matthew: I don’t mind.
Anne: I’m so glad. I know that you and I are gonna get along together just fine. It’s such a relief to talk when one wants to and not be told that children should be seen and not heard. I’ve had that said to me a million times if I have once. People would laugh at me because I use big words, but they’re exciting and descriptive words, like “enraptured” and “glorious”. If you have big ideas, you have to use big words to express them, haven’t you?
Matthew: Well… I suppose so.
Anne: For example… I am enraptured by this glorious landscapes!
Matthew: Just careful now. Careful.

 

 

Dialogue

 

Anne: I cannot believe that I’m going to get live somewhere so beautiful. Dreams don’t often come true, do they? But just now I feel pretty nearly perfectly happy. Although I can’t feel exactly perfectly happy because, well… what color would you call this?
Matthew: It’s red, isn’t it?
Anne: Yes, it’s red. Now you see why I can’t be perfectly happy. Nobody could who has red hair. It’s… my lifelong sorrow.

 

 

Dialogue

Rachel: Only don’t say I didn’t warn you if he burns Green Gables down, or put strychnine in the well. I heard of a case over in New Brunswick where an orphan asylum child did just that, and the whole family died in fearful agonies. Only it was a girl in that instant.
Marilla: Well, we’re not getting a girl.

 

 

“Other people may call it “The Avenue,” but I shall always call it “the White Way of Delight.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Matthew: This here is Barry’s Pond.
Anne: I don’t like that name, either. I shall call it… let me see… “The Lake of Shining Waters.” Yes, that’s the right name for it. I-I know because of the thrill.

 

 

“I suppose I gave Mrs. Hammond a thrill, then. She was happy to be rid of me after her husband died.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Don’t you just love them? The geese? I do. They’re a very romantical species of bird.
Matthew: Well, I wouldn’t know about that.
Anne: Did you know they mate for life? They choose each other out of all the other geese in the world, and they stay together until death do they part.

 

 

““Home” What a wonderful word.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“I have pinched myself so many times today. Every little while, this horrible sickening feeling would come over me, and I’d be so afraid that this was all a dream. But I just had to one more time. This is real. Green Gables is real and we’re home.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: Little girl? Little girl!
Anne: Little girl? I wish I was anything but.
Marilla: There’s no point in crying. There’s been a mistake, is all. We’re not gonna turn you out of doors tonight. What is your name?
Anne: What does it matter? I won’t be here long enough for you to remember.
Marilla: You will mind your manners and answer the question.
Anne: Please… call me Cordelia.
Marilla: Call you Cordelia? Is that your name?
Anne: Or Penelope? Penelope has a very tragical ring to it.
Marilla: What is your name, child?
Anne: Couldn’t you call me either of those? My name is Anne. Plain Anne.
Marilla: Anne is a fine name. A sensible name.
Anne: Could you please spell it with an “E” when you speak it? Anne with an “E” looks much more distinguished.
Marilla: Very well, then. Anne, with an “E”, it’s time to come inside. Get yourself up now.

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: I’m sorry to disappoint you, but there’s nothing to be done. We want a boy to help Matthew with the farm work. A girl would be of no use to us. Do you understand?
Anne: I can’t say that I do.
Marilla: I beg your pardon?
Anne: I don’t mean any disrespect, but couldn’t I do the farm chores even though I’m a girl?
Marilla: That’s not the way of things, and you know it.
Anne: But couldn’t I? I’m as strong as a boy, and I prefer to be outdoors instead of cooped up in a kitchen. I don’t understand the conundrum. For example, what if suddenly there were no boys in the world? None at all?
Marilla: Fiddlesticks.
Anne: It doesn’t make sense that girls aren’t allowed to do farm work when girls can do anything a boy can do and more. Do you consider yourself to be delicate and incapable? Because I certainly don’t. Anyway, since I’m here now, couldn’t you consider it?
Marilla: I could not. And put those fool notions out of your head.

 

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: Well, you’re not eating at all.
Anne: I can’t. I’m sorry. I’m in the depths of despair. Can you eat when you’re in the depths of despair?
Marilla: I’ve never been in the depths of despair, so I can’t say.
Anne: Well, did you ever imagine that you were in the depths of despair?
Marilla: No, I didn’t.
Anne: Well, it’s a very uncomfortable feeling, indeed. When you try to eat, a big lump comes right up into your throat, and you can’t swallow anything. Not even if it was a chocolate caramel. I had chocolate caramel once two years ago, and it was simply delicious. I hope you won’t be offended that I can’t eat. Everything is extremely nice.
Matthew: I guess she’s just tired. Best put her to bed, hmm?

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: Good night.
Anne: How can you call it a good night when you know this must be the very worst night I’ve ever had?

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: Matthew Cuthbert, do you mean to say you think we ought to keep her?
Matthew: No, no, no. I-i-i… No, I suppose not.
Marilla: I should say not! What good would she be to us?
Matthew: We might be some good to her.
Marilla: I believe that child has bewitched you. I can see it plain as plain you want to keep her.
Matthew: She’s a real interesting kind of person.
Marilla: That’s one way to put it.
Matthew: You should have heard her talk, coming from the station.
Marilla: Well, she can talk fast enough, and it’s nothing in her favor.
Matthew: I don’t mind the conversation.
Marilla: I don’t like children who have so much to say. There’s something I don’t understand about her. No, she’s gotta be dispatched straightway back where she came from.
Matthew: I could hire a boy to help me, and, uh, she could be company for you.
Marilla: I’m not suffering for company. And I’m not gonna keep her.
Matthew: Well, now… it’s just as you say, of course.

 

 

“Dearest Snow Queen… I accept your token offering. Had I book, I would press these sacred blossoms between its pages, so that I could be forever reminded of this treasured moment. Nevertheless… I, Princess Cordelia… shall cherish this gift always. Let my kiss prove my devotion.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“I was imagining that this morning was different than what it is. I was making believe that I was a beautiful princess, and that this was my sacred chamber, high in a tall stone spire.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: I’m pretty hungry this morning. The world doesn’t seem such a howling wilderness as it did last night. I’m glad it’s a pretty morning, so we won’t be driving back in the rain. That would be extremely difficult to bear. It’s all very well to read sorrowful stories, and imagine yourself living through them heroically, but… it’s not so easy when you’re actually woeful.
Marilla: Oh, for pity’s sake, hold your tongue. You talk entirely too much.
Anne: Yes, ma’am.

 

 

“You can’t make up a family. Only kin in kin.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: My brother is a ridiculous man.
Anne: I think he’s lovely. He’s ever so sympathetic, and he didn’t seem to mind how much I talked. In fact, he seemed to like it. I felt he was a kindred spirit as soon as ever I saw him.
Marilla: You’re both queer enough, that’s for sure in certain.
Anne: I’ve made up my mind to enjoy this drive. It’s been my experience you can nearly always enjoy something if you make up your mind firmly that you will. Of course, you must make up your mind firmly. I believe this is something that you and I have in common.

 

 

“I wish I was a seagull. They’re the most carefree of all the birds, don’t you think?”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Isn’t pink just the most bewitching color? I love it, but I can’t wear it. Redheaded people can’t wear pink, not even in the imagination.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Do you know of anybody whose hair was red when she was younger, but got to be another color when she grew up?
Marilla: I shouldn’t think it likely.
Anne: There’s another hope gone. “My life is perfect graveyard of buried hopes.” I read that sentence in a book once. And I say it to comfort myself whenever I’m disappointed in anything.
Marilla: I don’t see where the comforting comes in myself.
Anne: Because it sounds so romantic, as if I were a heroine in a storybook.
Marilla: You must have gone to school.
Anne: Not a great deal, although I went recently when I was back at the asylum. I love school. But in a household with so much to attend to, the children, the cooking, the chores, it just wasn’t an option.

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: I didn’t ask for any story, I asked for yours. If you can’t tell the truth, then I have no time for you.
Anne: If you let me tell you what I imagine about myself, you’ll find it ever so much more interesting.
Marilla: Wishing something is different than it is will not make it so!
Anne: Truer words were never spoken. My parents were Walter and Bertha Shirley. They were newlyweds, and they were poor as church mice. They died of a fever when I was three months old. So I’ve been earning my keep for as long as I can remember, and… I suppose I was lucky that I was placed out, instead of staying in the asylum. I never understood it. If children are such a burden, then why do people have so many of them? Nevertheless, it’s a shame I’ll never have the opportunity.
Marilla: What do you mean?
Anne: To be one.

 

 

“I’m used to a ruckus.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“However, the mistake has been made, and the only thing to do is to set it right.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: I noticed last night that you threw your clothes all about the floor when you took them off. That is a very untidy habit, and I can’t allow it. You must fold your clothing neatly and place it on the chair. I haven’t any use for little girls who aren’t neat.
Anne: I was so harrowed up in my mind last night that I didn’t think about my clothes at all. I’ll fold them nicely tonight. Although, I have been known to forget. I’m usually in such a hurry to finally get to bed.

 

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: Now… say your prayers and get into bed.
Anne: I never say any prayers.
Marilla: What?
Anne: Well, I said them at the asylum Sunday School. I liked the catechism. There’s something splendid about some of the words. “Infinite and unchangeable.” It’s not quite poetry, but it sounds a lot like it, doesn’t it?
Marilla: We’re not talking about poetry, Anne. We’re talking about prayers. Don’t you know it’s a terrible wicked thing not to say your prayers every night?
Anne: I’m sorry. I-I-I was never taught to say them.
Marilla: You must say your prayers while you’re under my roof.
Anne: Of course. If you want me to. I’d do anything to oblige you. But you’ll have to tell me how to say them, for just this once.
Marilla: You must kneel down.
Anne: Why must people kneel down to pray? If I really wanted to pray, I’ll tell you what I’d do. I’d go into a great big field all alone… or into the deep, deep woods, and I’d look up into the sky, up up up, into that lovely blue sky without end… and I would just feel a prayer.

 

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: As God is my witness, I will do everything in my earthly power to make you want to keep me.
Marilla: Good night.
Anne: God, give me strength to succeed in my quest!
Marilla: That will do.
Anne: Sorry. I quite like praying.

 

 

“The girl’s next door to a perfect heathen. God only knows what we’re getting ourselves into.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

“It’s so easy to love Green Gables, isn’t it?”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: May I take these blossoms up to my room?
Marilla: No! You don’t want your room or your person cluttered up with flowers. You should have left them on the tree in the first place.
Anne: I felt that way, too. I shouldn’t shorten their lovely lives by picking them. I mean, I wouldn’t want to be picked if I were a blossom. Wouldn’t it be lovely to be a blossom?
Marilla: Yesterday you wanted to be a seagull.

 

 

“I don’t believe in frills or flounces.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

“Puff sleeve are divine.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Brown is a very sensible color.”

(Marilla Cuthbert)

 

 

Dialogue

 

Rachel: Well, they didn’t pick you for your looks, that’s sure and certain. She’s terribly skinny and homely, Marilla. All elbows and knees. Did you ever see such freckles? And hair as red as carrots! Dear, dear me.
Anne: I hate you.
Marilla: Anne…
Anne: I hate you, I hate you, I hate you!
Marilla: Anne!
Anne: How dare you call me skinny and ugly! And how dare you call me freckled and redheaded! You are a rude, unfeeling woman!
Rachel: Well!
Anne: How would you like to have such things said about you? H-How would you like to be told that you’re fat and clumsy, and that you probably hadn’t a spark of imagination in you? And I don’t care if I hurt your feelings by saying so. I hope I hurt them! Because you have hurt my feelings worse than they have ever been hurt before! And I will never forgive you for this! Never, never!

 

 

Dialogue

Marilla: I appreciate that you’re contrite, Anne… but the person that you owe the apology to is Mrs. Lynde.
Anne: But she hadn’t any right to call me ugly and redheaded.
Marilla: You say it yourself often enough.
Anne: But there’s such a difference between saying a thing yourself and hearing other people say it.
Marilla: You need to learn discipline.
Anne: Just imagine how you would feel if someone told you to your face that you were skinny and ugly.
Matthew: Remember when we were young, Marilla, old lady Adams said—
Marilla: Yes.
Matthew: That you were gawky—
Marilla: Yes. Thank you.
Matthew: I recall you suffered from it— 
Marilla:
I don’t say Mrs. Lynde was exactly right in saying what she did to you, Anne. She’s too outspoken.
Anne: She’s a bully.
Marilla: But that is no excuse for such behavior on your part. You were rude and saucy, and you must go to Mrs. Lynde and tell her that you’re sorry and ask her to forgive you.
Anne: I could never do that. Punish me any way you like. Shut me up in the dark, damp dungeon and I shan’t complain, but I cannot ask Mrs. Lynde to forgive me.
Marilla: We’re not in the habit of shutting people up in dungeons. But apologize to Mrs. Lynde you must. And you’ll stay up in your room until you can tell me you’re willing to do it.
Anne: I’ll have to stay up there forever, then. Because I can’t tell Mrs. Lynde I’m sorry I said those things to her.  How can I? I’m not sorry. I’m sorry I vexed you, but I’m glad I told her just what I did. It was a great satisfaction! In fact, I can’t even imagine that I’m sorry.
Marilla: Well, let’s hope your imagination is in better working  order by morning.

 

 

“If I apologize, I’ll be fibbing.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“It’s terrible lonesome downstairs without you. I’m not used to the quiet anymore.”

(Matthew Cuthbert)

 

 

Dialogue

 

Anne: The trouble is that the prospect seems humiliating and unfair. 
Matthew: But you’re smart enough… to find the right words, I’m sure of it.
Anne: But why should the apology have to come from me when it was Mrs. Lynde who caused the entire situation?
Matthew: Well, you know… I like to think that… that one fine day, it won’t matter a whit to you what anybody says sideways.
Anne: You have a good imagination. I suppose it would be true enough to say I’m sorry. I am sorry I upset Miss Marilla. And you.
Matthew: So go and smooth things over, can’t you?
Anne: Very well. I’ll attempt it. For you.
Matthew: Now that’s good news.

 

 

“I shall carry our secret to my grave.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Thank you for your kind consideration. I look forward to never minding what you say again.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“She has a queer way of expressing herself. Forcible, like.”

(Rachel Lynde)

 

 

“Although, apologizing is my new favorite thing.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: How long will you be here?
Jerry: Allo. You must be Anne.
Anne: With an “E.”
Jerry: Uh… Je m’appelle Jerry. Jerry Baynard. Nice to meet you.
Anne: “Baynard”? Foolhardy.
Jerry: Pardon?
Anne: Your surname means “reckless or foolhardy.” Charlemagne even named his impossible horse Baynard.
Jerry: I don’t know him. Charlemagne.
Anne: Of course you don’t. He died hundreds of years ago!
Jerry: So you’re living here now?
Anne: Yes. Probably. I… I don’t know.
Jerry: Pretty here. You’re lucky.
Anne: I don’t remember you from the orphanage.
Jerry: No, no. I live in town. Big family. We have a small shop, but with so many, some of us must work.
Anne: Well, if you come from such a large family, it may trouble your conscience to know that you’re displacing my own position in my very first potential family.
Jerry: I am hired through harvest, so…
Anne: I don’t think the Cuthberts will need you if I stay. In fact, if you hand me your pitchfork, I’ll be happy to finish your task.
Jerry: What’s your problem?
Anne: You. You’re my problem.
Jerry: All I’m doing is my job. What are you supposed to be doing?

 

 

“Before we permit our children to associate with your Anne, my wife and I need to assure ourselves that she won’t corrupt their good natures or exert any negative influence. I’m sure you can understand.”

(William Barry)

 

 

“I’ll be as quiet as a mouse.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“It’s so nice to be wearing something new, I don’t even mind not having puff sleeves.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Oh, isn’t this lovely?
Marilla: Hand it here.
Anne: May I try it on?
Marilla: That is not a toy. This is a treasured possession. Do you understand?
Anne: I completely understand. Amethyst is my favorite. I think diamonds pale in comparison.
Marilla: Do you now?
Anne: Amethysts are so much more romantic.
Marilla: Now this was my grandmother’s. My mother bequeathed it to me.
Anne: Well, it’s perfectly elegant.

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Does needlepoint provide much scope for the imagination?
Diana: I don’t think imagination is my strong suit.
Anne: Really? I don’t know what I’d do without mine. Life would be an agony. An utter agony.
Diana: Agony!

 

 

Dialogue

Anne: Diana… do you think you could like me just a little?
Diana: I already do!
Anne: Shall we swear to be best friends forever and ever?
Diana: It’s dreadfully wicked to swear.
Anne: No! It’s not my kind of swearing. There are two kinds. I know because I have a worldly outlook. This kind isn’t wicked at all. It means vowing and promising solemnly.  I swear it does. See?
Diana: How do you do it?
Anne: Well… Well, this ought to be done by moonlight or over running water… but we’ll imagine that it’s nighttime and this path is a stream. Hold this, and twist your pinky finger around mine. I’ll repeat the oath first. I solemnly swear… to be faithful to my bosom friend, Diana Barry, for as long as the sun and moon shall endure.”

 

 

“Diana says she doesn’t have much imagination, but I don’t think it matters, since I have enough for both of us.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“Diana and I are kindred spirits. And I think she’d be struck quite sad if I were to be sent away.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

“I realize now it’s the only thing I truly want, so you don’t have to worry yourself about my red hair.”

(Anne Shirley)

 

 

MY BEST SHOT

 

 

***

 

 

Sutradara: Niki Caro

Penulis Skenario: Moira Walley-Beckett

Berdasarkan Novel Karya Lucy Maud Montgomery: “Anne of Green Gables”

Musik: Amin Bhatia & Ari Posner

Sinematografer: Bobby Shore

Desain Kostum: Anne Dixon

Tayang Perdana: 12 Mei 2017

Durasi: 88 Menit

Nonton di: Netflix

Rating: 5 dari 5 Bintang

 

Ditulis oleh

Sometimes She's in the Mood for Books, for Movies, for TV Series, for Music, to Write, or Doing Nothing at All and Be DEAD. She Just Goes with Her Own Speed. But Sure She'll Try Her Best to Catch Up with the World.

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